Bespoke Digital Solution To Your Business. Free Counsultancy

Category: Design

7 Main Reasons Your Website Isn’t Generating Income

I outline seven reasons in today’s post for why your website isn’t generating any revenue for you.

Therefore, it’s the same old tale: you have a fantastic website and assume it’s going to blow up because everyone will flock to it. So, in this post, I’m going to discuss 7 reasons why your website isn’t generating any revenue, how to solve it, and how to make your website a money-generating machine.

I’ll go over seven techniques to effectively optimize your website for conversions. I’m now displaying websites to you that have generated millions of dollars in income, millions of conversions, and hundreds of lead generation alternatives.

I want to start by teaching you something Rand Segall said a few years ago. He published a video demonstrating the optimum website design. Although you shouldn’t adhere to this rule to the letter, it does contain the principles required to create a website that is growth-friendly. Naturally, you want to have all of the information a user needs to make a decision on your website available before the fold.

The process therefore begins with a title, headline, or tagline of some kind, a subtitle that may elaborate on that tagline, and a CTA/Call-To-Action that may be a button or the primary point of contact you want website visitors to make. And finally, of course, some kind of social proof, which can be a testimonial, a link to one of your case studies, and then a visual. This can be a little bit further down the page.

The most crucial information should be in the top left corner of your website, and everything should flow smoothly because the majority of website visitors will read from left to right when they are there.

Therefore, let’s go through some of these.

1) Texting

Your messaging is unclear, terse, and fails to provide the user with the information they require as soon as they arrive at the website.

You can see that it states, “We design lucrative branding and websites for startups,” on our agency’s website. We pretty much only do that; that is what we do. Therefore, it makes it simple for the user to come here and grasp exactly what kind of service we should offer and why they want to collaborate with us.

That’s one, then: avoid creating complicated, outlandish taglines and make sure your messaging is succinct and simple to comprehend. The most important thing is to keep it simple: stick to 7–10 words, one sentence, and something you can say to someone in an elevator without too much difficulty.

2) A Call-To-Action

Your website should have crystal-clear calls to action. As you can see, the website has two calls to action here, a call to action or button here, and elsewhere. This is evident on every kind of website you can find online, where choosing a course of action is quite simple and obvious.

Therefore, if I visit the homepage of Slack, for instance, we will understand and see all of those right here in their design. You can tell I’m on the Slack features page because there is a big, obvious call to action to “Get started” or “See all features.”

If I click “See all features,” it’s gonna let me scroll through the page and learn more about the brand. They even have this sticky menu up here to make sure that call-to-action is always clear and easy to see as I scroll throughout that website.

So make sure that you have calls-to-action throughout–don’t overload, folks! Keep it consistent across the board, but try to make all of your buttons or calls-to-action go to a place where they can perform some type of action, and convert on your website.

3) Social Evidence

Another thing I always suggest—and you’d be astonished at how many organizations I find doing this—is that they don’t have any references, case studies, or other evidence that demonstrates their expertise.

In light of this, I always, always advise doing it above the fold. If you are unable to put that above the fold, be sure to add it someplace on your homepage so visitors can learn more about you.

Now, if you scroll down on our website, harnixtech.com.ng, you’ll see reviews from actual clients with whom we’ve partnered and worked. This is incredibly effective.

Focusing on obtaining Google reviews that you can then use is another option. You should write an honest review because you can post it on your website. However, if you also use Google for reviews, you now have a location to store those reviews and you also appear locally in that map pack, which is going to be essential to your development.

Making sure you have endorsements, reviews, or some other form of social evidence that demonstrates your expertise is the third step. You can always refer back to this file because, as you can see, it contains my social proof. Additionally, once you scroll down the website, more social proof appears below the fold.

People need to understand how to collaborate and what it’s like to work with you. In order to determine whether we are competent at what we do and whether our potential clients want to work with us, I’ve had clients or prospects contact us first. Then, they’ll go and contact our existing clients to get testimonials and real, live reviews.

So make it simple for visitors to your website to find those endorsements and reviews.

4) Funding

Next, simplify the user experience as much as you can to help users decide if you’re the right fit for them.

If not, I’ll quickly explain it here. This is simply our online form, so I’m going to keep it short and sweet and just begin to fill it out. Type: awol.com Okay, so this is where it gets weird, isn’t it? It’s cool: it works, but I’m not sure whether that’s the appropriate word.

Therefore, be sure your website has a question or something like. Because of the fact that we previously had a website, a really simple form, and a ton of leads.

However, a large portion of those leads either had the necessary funds or didn’t meet our ideal client profile. Therefore, like I mentioned earlier, have clear messaging, right? Who your ideal customers are should be included in that messaging.

Ours are new businesses. They can click that after reading some of your testimonies and evaluations, so that call-to-action is also fantastic.

Naturally, the fourth reason your website isn’t converting is that you’re now being targeted and offering a client’s ideal budget that you’d like to work with.

5) Communication

You probably aren’t measuring the interactions on your website, which is reason number 5 for why your website isn’t converting.

This company, blackillustrators.com, offers a website where you can download illustrations with people of color in them. We can now go ahead and add some design features and make this site attractive, but that’s something we’re doing at random, right? We don’t base those decisions on the information we now have.

We want to make sure the page has strong calls-to-action and that the most popular illustration packs are near the top because a lot of people are clicking on the illustration packs. We also see that many individuals are using search engines, so we want to be sure we have all the search terms and keywords we may require.

A majority of the illustrations we produce are related to the business category because people adore that one. Check out how this heat map is helping us decide how the interactions on this website should go.

You can view recordings made using Microsoft Clarity and observe real-time interactions between visitors to your website. Being able to examine and say, “Okay, well, this individual spent only this amount of time on this page, maybe we should make some modifications,” is vital.

Now that Google Analytics and Microsoft Clarity are both free tools, which you are probably already aware of, use them to examine your website’s top performing pages, analyze your heat map created with Clarity, listen to recordings, and determine how to improve it so that users will convert more easily.

6) Simpleness

The sixth and final piece of advice I have for you all is to keep things straightforward.

Sometimes website activity is overdone; there is too much going on. As you can see, there are only 5 products on our menu. We make it very streamlined and straightforward for the end user, with no submenu of a submenu of a submenu and no 15,000 places to go.

Consider Stripe, perhaps one of the best payment processing platforms on the planet, if you look at all the top websites. You see how easy it is, don’t you? The main menu consists of 5 things; some of these have giant menus, but overall, the layout is straightforward.

There aren’t many calls to action throughout the website as you scroll; you can find one here, one further down, and one here. Really sleek and easy to understand. One of the largest payment processors in the world is undoubtedly this one.

However, make sure that using your website is simple. Limit the number of primary navigational options on your website to six, keep the content simple, and make it simple for visitors to find what they’re looking for.

Having your contact information in the header or footer, ensuring that there aren’t too many calls-to-action on each page, and making sure the website is, of course, responsive for all the various device kinds are some quick and easy ways to do this.

7) Design

The last thing I’ll say is that your branding does not compel the user to trust you.

I frequently come across websites with terrible branding, and the response I always get is, “Oh well, branding doesn’t matter, the look and feel doesn’t matter.” It’s the content’s caliber.

That much is true, but the first thing that visitors notice about your website is its appearance: is it appealing, does it look amazing, how does the overall flow feel, are the colors balanced and subtle, and does it generally seem wonderful? You want to make sure that your website appears fantastic, and I’ll tell you right now that our previous website looked alright. The conversions were decent, but it wasn’t outrageously good.

We need to make that adjustment now to make sure that it corresponds with the kind of customer that we’re going to target after we relaunched and refreshed our brand and went and said, “We’re charging a premium to our clients, we want to make sure that our website looks premium as well.” Our leads also increased dramatically.

But once more, you want to make sure that your branding is strong for website visitors. And the key reason is that you need to be appealing to the end user naturally. They must immediately notice uniformity throughout the website since how you conduct business will be reflected in how your brand appears to customers.

Conclusion

I appreciate you all who read through this long post, We would like to hear your comments on this, Thanks!.

5 Books Every Web Designer Should Read

I’m going to review five books today that have been beneficial to me as a brand strategist, web designer, and developer. So let’s go!

1) Book of Branding | Radim Malinic

Book of Branding | Radim Malinic

I’m going to start with this book called The Book of Branding first, before anything else. It was created by Radim Malinic and does a fantastic job at demonstrating the foundations of branding and design. As you can see, every page is entirely visual, and I’ve included a ton of tabs for information that has particularly resonated.

It discusses what should be included in your final deliverables for your branding, such as color scheme, branding costs, and how much to charge. It’s just a really well-written book that you can finish in, say, an afternoon.

2) Show Your Work! | Austin Kleon

Show Your Work! | Austin Kleon

The next thing, which is certainly among the top 5 or 10 of all time, dramatically altered the way I view branding and design in general. Show Your Work! by Austin Kleon is the title of this. Once more, a coffee table book that you can read in about an hour.

He stresses that everything you do in terms of the procedures and activities you are engaging in with regard to branding, design, and development should be documented and made public. I am a tremendous fan of Austin’s work and cannot say enough wonderful things about this book, which is undoubtedly second on my list.

3) Chris Do’s Pocket Full of Do

Chris Do's Pocket Full of Do

Chris Do, also known as Pocket Full of Do, is up next. I recently had the chance to meet this man, and when it comes to digital, he is pretty much my spirit animal. On the West Coast, he founded the highly successful agency Blind, where they collaborated with some very outstanding businesses, including Xbox.

Another fantastic creative is Matthew Encina, who is also his creative director and whom I recently met. But in the end, this individual compiled all of the most important lessons he had learned about entrepreneurship, teaching, and creative during the previous ten years. Chris is quite strong.

Check out his content under the name The Futur if you get a chance; he has an agency. Additionally, he discusses the commercial and branding aspects of design. I can’t rave about this book enough; it’s yet another easy read that you can get through in an afternoon.

Visually, it’s stunning, and he basically condensed everything he had learnt over the previous 10 to 20 years into a nice-sized book called Pocket Full of Do. Pick up that book as well, I say.

4) Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited | Steve Krug

Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited | Steve Krug

The following appears to be a little dated, but use caution. You will gain a thorough understanding of UI/UX. Don’t Make Me Think is the title of the song, and this is the Revisited version.

In short, this is likely one of the best sources for information on a practical approach to web usability. Therefore, it discusses what you should do to maximize the amount of time people spend on your website, great ways to frame content, and the function of navigation.

Even if some of the information in this article is a little out of date, it will still offer you the building blocks you need to create a fantastic website that works well. Check it out once again; it’s a fantastic read with lots of illustrations; as you can see, I’ve underlined this thing like crazy. I frequently go back to it while developing new builds, site maps, and websites.

5) Value Proposition Design

Value Proposition Design

The last but not least edition is called Value Proposition Design, and I completed it a year or so ago. It’s about how to construct a value proposition that the end user would like to have or include in their overall experience and how to frame material accordingly.

Just a really beautifully done graphic book. It discusses business structure, how to develop workable technology, data, how to use data in website design, and how to shape your ideas. As you can see from these two covers, the book is also very visually appealing.

Really well done, but at the end, it will teach you how to establish a website and produce goods that customers actually want, using the web.

Conclusion

You all have my list of five books. They are listed below. As you are all aware, I read a lot, so if you have any recommendations, please list them below.

All five of these works can be read fairly rapidly, to reiterate. You could definitely complete these in a few of weeks, after all. But again, have a look at these: Designing a value proposition, Make sure you purchase the Revisited edition of Don’t Make Me Think. Book of Branding is another classic, followed by Show Your Work and Pocket Full of Do.

5 Signs That Your Website Needs A Redesign

Neglecting or running an outdated website is one of the top mistakes that organizations make nowadays.

Just having social media accounts won’t cut it if you want your business to succeed online; you must step it up and provide your clients a well-maintained website that they can browse and interact with.

What’s your apologies?

Typical justifications given by website owners for not redesigning their outdated sites include:

  1. I appreciate the existing design, but in reality, what matters is what is “effective” or “essential,” not what you “enjoy.”
  2. I routinely update the information on my website: People are either drawn to or turned off by a website’s design before they read any information.
  3. Design is irrelevant: Design does, in fact, matter. According to research, 38% of users will quit interacting with a website if the design or content are unappealing.
  4. My website is superior to those of my rivals’ Even if this is the case, a well-designed website can help you do far better by significantly raising your conversion rate.

If the design or content of a website is ugly, 38% of visitors will stop interacting with it. So let’s go through 5 valid signs why your website needs a redesign.

1) Your website appears dated or jumbled

Does your website resemble a design from the 1980s? Your website is undoubtedly out of date if it was designed at least three years ago. Because websites deteriorate with time, think about redesigning.

To draw in and keep visitors on your website, it must appear sufficiently contemporary. Additionally, it must have a visually pleasing design.

Regularly check the copyright (©) year at the bottom of your website to ensure it’s the current year. A past date makes it look like your website has expired or isn’t active.

Your new site ought to:

  • appear tidy and less cluttered;
  • have content that is organized well;
  • Be appealing to visitors’ eyes;
  • a menu with clear navigation;
  • contain the proper pictures.

2) Search engines do not give your website a high ranking

You should absolutely think about a thorough overhaul if search engines aren’t picking up on the existence of your website.

You would have the chance to reconsider your content strategy and rewrite your content in a way that is search engine friendly if you redesign your website.

If you are serious about success online, SEO is no joke. With this advice in mind, a fresh and contemporary website should be created.

Your new site ought to:

  • Feature informative, well-written material that is packed with relevant keywords;
  • employ headings and meta tags appropriately;
  • contain pictures that have been search engine optimized;
  • a sitemap in XML;
  • being put up on search engines;
  • Adapt to mobile devices (more on this below).

3) Your website doesn’t aid in lead generation

A well-designed website is an excellent marketing tool that should aid in the expansion of your company. Your current website should absolutely be redone if it doesn’t support your company’s objectives.

Your new website ought to include:

  • clear summons to action
  • Easily accessible contact details
  • attractive landing pages
  • brief and powerful forms
  • No links are broken

39% of people will stop engaging with a website if images won’t load or take too long to load.

4) Your website doesn’t support mobile devices

A mobile-friendly website is not only fantastic, but also essential given that 40 to 60 percent of website visitors utilize mobile devices.

If your website isn’t “responsive,” a revamp is overdue.

A responsive website is one that adapts seamlessly to the screen sizes of the device being used by a visitor. This kind of website resizes, hides, shrinks, enlarges, or moves the content to make it look good on any screen.

If you still aren’t persuaded, it’s crucial to understand that mobile friendliness has a significant impact on how well your website performs in search results. Google normally ranks a mobile-friendly website higher than one that isn’t when a user searches on a mobile device.

Your new site ought to:

  • Be receptive;
  • quickly load on mobile devices;
  • present content in a way that is simple to read;
  • Have obvious, large enough to tap calls-to-action (CTAs) on mobile devices;
  • Have images that are the right size.

5) Out-of-date features, capabilities, materials, or images

  1. Is your information still current?
  2. Is your website still effective at conveying your current core beliefs and objectives?
  3. Do all of your website’s features function properly?

Consider eliminating certain elements from your website if you find that they are out of date or not functioning properly. However, if they make up a significant portion, redesigning is your best choice.

Maintaining a properly functional and pertinent website is crucial for attracting website visitors.

You may even come to the realization that your company has outgrown some features or content on your website and that a redesign is necessary to both refresh the material and make room for new and essential stuff.

As a result…

Please notice that not all of the aforementioned offenses must be present on your website in order for you to think about redesigning it. We advise that you redesign your website if any of the aforementioned situations apply to you.

You may also think about occasionally visiting the websites of your rivals to see what they are doing in terms of website design that you are not doing, to learn from them.

Your website is a visual representation of your business and as such it must be excellent.

The Basics of User Experience (UX) and its Seven Principles

User experience, or UX, encompasses all of a consumer’s digital interactions with a product and the business that made it. It is described by ISO as “human-centered design principles & activities (that) […] promote human-system interaction (through the life-cycle of computer-based interactive systems)” (ISO, 2010). What does that signify, though?

In plain English, user experience (UX) design concepts aim to make all consumer encounters with a business’s communication platforms (often a website or app) pleasant and stress-free.

What distinguishes UI and UX from one another?

Difference Between Ui and Ux

When it comes to UX, this is one of the most frequently asked questions. User interface, or UI, is essentially the component of a computer system with which a user interacts, such as the home page of a website, a contact form, an online shopping cart, etc. The design decisions that give interfaces their appealing appearance and high level of interactivity are referred to as UI. This covers the use of typeface, color, and layout as well as graphic design.

UX, on the other hand, refers to a collection of practical design principles that are utilized to enhance user experience by making interfaces simpler to use and navigate. Wireframes, information architecture, and interface design are all included in this. The most important factor is that they work together; UI is typically preceded by UX. Beautiful UI and useful UX are essential components of an engaging and effective website.

Which Core UX Principles apply?

The fundamental tenets of UX design are supported by seven essential elements. Let’s go over each one individually:

Useful

Is there any use for anything on the user interface? The usage of pictures is a prime illustration of this. Although having a visually appealing website is essential to UI design, your website shouldn’t contain photos merely for aesthetic reasons. Your website’s images should all be helpful. Does your image illustrate or support a point made on your page? Are there any links to other pages? Has it been attached with Alt Text to improve the page’s SEO? Is the photo instructive? These inquiries can be used for all of your interface’s elements, including buttons, menus, and copy (text).

Usable

Is it simple to use every interactive component on the user interface? Are there any broken buttons? Does every link to an external website launch a new window? Are there any forms that permit the completion of check boxes, drop-down menus, or free-text fields? Most essential, can the consumer use these components without confusion? Not every piece on your interface needs to have written instructions, but is it obvious which elements are interactive (meant to be clicked) and which are not? This idea extends to responsive web design, which renders your website equally usable across a variety of interface gadgets.

Findable

The user interface’s interactive and educational components should all be simple to find. The information architecture of the website as a whole or little features like the placement of a checkout button can be considered. The sitemaps, menu design, and page structure are all parts of the information architecture. In other words, can users easily find certain pages on your website using the menu, internal links, or HTML sitemap? Additionally, can consumers readily access all the information they require on these pages? Not only is information architecture crucial for UX, but also for SEO.

Credible

Customers use credibility as a crucial sign of whether or not they can trust your company, and as we all know, trust is essential for both conversions and brand loyalty. You can establish trust in your UX design in one of two ways. First of all, your entire interface (or interfaces) should have a consistent UX and UI design. You must also have consistency in the interface design and information architecture, in addition to having consistent branding, colors, and font, etc. Do all buttons have the same appearance and behavior? Do all service pages have the same categories?

Second, confirm that your design decisions are in line with user needs and support them with reliable user testing. When you first design your website and after any significant redesigns, testing should be done. This testing could be card sorting, surveys, interviews, etc. Including a user survey pop-up on your website, which might trigger when the client converts and asks them to answer a few questions about their experience on the website, is one of the simplest ways to achieve this.

Desirable

Any business’s ability to succeed depends on the demand for the product or service it offers. In UX design, creating an emotional response is greatly aided by the use of branding, aesthetics, and functionality. A favorable emotional response will make a product desirable to the buyer who is just looking, who is therefore more likely to convert. Do you think anyone would find your product desirable on a website that only had a white background, black text, and no photos, interactive components, or information architecture?

Accessible

Making your website accessible for users who could have impaired eyesight, loss of hearing, a learning disability, or mobility handicap is a crucial yet frequently disregarded part of UX design. Among other things, the UX design step of making your website accessible should include adding alt text, providing options for alternative text sizes, and planning for keyboard usage. In many regions of the world, accessible web design is now not only required by law, but also something that every company should strive for in order to avoid excluding sizable segments of the population from their product or service offerings.

Valuable

The consumer should be able to discover value in the website itself, the browsing experience, and any products or services offered. The idea of value in user experience (UX) extends beyond monetary or material worth to encompass intangible advantages like joy and knowledge. Therefore, consider whether each page of your website offers the user something worthwhile, such as knowledge, interesting content, entertaining interactions, or a real product.

UX Jargon Decoder

User Experience Principles

A short jargon buster for all the terminology you might encounter when researching UX design has been put together because we realize we’ve thrown a lot of knowledge at you very rapidly.

  • “Alternative Text” is the alt text. a succinct written description of a website image that improves accessibility and SEO value.
  • Conversions – A consumer has converted when they accomplish the objectives you want them to. Buying a product, subscribing to a newsletter, or completing a form are examples of common conversions.
  • Copy: Copy is all of your website’s written content. Copy contains headings, paragraphs, questions on forms, and policies in the website footer, among other things.
  • Engagement: How visitors engage with the information on your website. Watching a video, clicking a link, navigating to a new part, or looking for a new page are all examples of engagement.
  • Functionality: How well a website accomplishes its goals and the variety of tasks it can perform. For instance, a functional online shopping cart and checkout system are necessary for an e-commerce website.
  • Visual components such as pictures, logos, banners, and borders are referred to as graphics.
  • The organization of your website’s pages, starting with the home page and moving outward to specific product pages, contact pages, and policy pages.
  • Design ideas called “interaction design” are used to promote user involvement with your website. frequently entails designing a user path through the website (from home page to conversion).
  • Interactive elements include buttons, links that can be clicked, pop-up windows, and movies. The interaction design is influenced by these factors.
  • Internal links are text links within your website copy that direct visitors to different sections or pages of your interface. These links are frequently associated with product names or text such as “read more” or “contact us.”
  • Links on your website that direct users to resources or pages on other websites are known as outbound links (often used in blog articles to link to supporting information from another website).
  • Product/Service Offering: The real goods or services that your company provides to customers.
  • Search engine optimization, or SEO. a number of techniques aimed at increasing the quantity and quality of visitors to your website by enhancing where and how it shows in search results (such as Google).
  • Sitemap: A written list of the pages on your website, both in code and copy form, that typically mirrors the site’s information architecture. Sitemaps are used by search engines to understand the organization of your website.
  • The visual layout of your written material is known as typography. Font, size, spacing, and color are all included.
  • User interface, or UI. the guidelines for designing appealing and interesting user interfaces.
  • Testing the effectiveness of how effectively your website satisfies user wants and expectations is known as user testing.
  • User Experience, or UX. the design principles that make it simple and pleasurable to use and navigate your user interface. plays a significant part in eliciting emotional reactions that result in conversions.
  • Wire frames are a visual representation of the structure of a website, the location of each interface element, and the function that each element serves in the UX design.